Ratlines


Ratlines
   A number of leading Nazis involved in the mass murder of Jews, such as Walter Rauff and Adolf Eichmann, were able to escape from Germany at the close of World War II through the so-called ratlines. This was an escape route that led them to safe havens in South America, particularly Argentina, Paraguay, Brazil, and Chile. Other destinations included the United States, Canada, and the Middle East. There were two primary routes: the first went from Germany to Spain, and then Argentina; the second from Germany to Rome, Genoa, and then South America. One ratline, made famous by the Frederick Forsyth novel The Odessa File, was run by the ODESSA (“Organization of Former SS Members”) network organized by Otto Skorzeny, an SS Obersturmbannfuhrer (lieutenantcolonel) in the German Waffen-SS. Another ratline was organized by a number of Vatican priests sympathetic to the Nazi cause.

Historical dictionary of the Holocaust. . 2014.

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  • Ratlines — Rat lines, Ratlins Rat lins (r[a^]t l[i^]nz), n. pl. [Of uncertain origin.] (Naut.) The small transverse ropes attached to the shrouds and forming the steps of a rope ladder. [Written also {ratlings}, and {rattlings}.] Totten. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ratlines — Este artículo o sección necesita referencias que aparezcan en una publicación acreditada, como revistas especializadas, monografías, prensa diaria o páginas de Internet fidedignas. Puedes añadirlas así o avisar …   Wikipedia Español

  • Ratlines — See Ratlines (history) for escape routes of WWII war criminals. Ratlines, pronounced rattlin s , are lengths of thin line tied between the shrouds of a sailing ship to form a ladder. They are found almost invariably on square rigged ships whose… …   Wikipedia

  • ratlines — rætlɪn n. horizontal piece of rope that connects the vertical ropes and forms a ladder (on ships) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • ratlines — [ ratlɪnz] plural noun a series of small rope lines fastened across a sailing ship s shrouds like the rungs of a ladder, used for climbing the rigging. Origin ME: of unknown origin …   English new terms dictionary

  • ratlines — …   Useful english dictionary

  • Ratlines (World War II) — Ratlines were a system of escape routes for Nazis and other fascists fleeing Europe at the end of World War II. These escape routes mainly led toward havens in South America, particularly Argentina, Paraguay, Brazil, Uruguay, and Chile. Other… …   Wikipedia

  • Ratlines (history) — Ratlines were systems of escape routes for Nazis and other fascists fleeing Europe at the end of World War II. These escape routes mainly led toward safe havens in South America, particularly Argentina, Paraguay, Brazil and Chile. Other… …   Wikipedia

  • ratlings — Ratlines Rat lines, Ratlins Rat lins (r[a^]t l[i^]nz), n. pl. [Of uncertain origin.] (Naut.) The small transverse ropes attached to the shrouds and forming the steps of a rope ladder. [Written also {ratlings}, and {rattlings}.] Totten. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ratlins — Ratlines Rat lines, Ratlins Rat lins (r[a^]t l[i^]nz), n. pl. [Of uncertain origin.] (Naut.) The small transverse ropes attached to the shrouds and forming the steps of a rope ladder. [Written also {ratlings}, and {rattlings}.] Totten. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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